Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Behavourial psychology

is a practise used by politicians and is also part of their process in the implementation of social engineering; prompted by, for example, research into some obscure aspect of social behaviour. The latest example comes with an article by James Hall, Consumer Affairs Editor of the Daily Telegraph.

Research by Unilever has uncovered some - of value to our political elite, something on which I will touch later - 'interesting' facts, namely that the average power shower costs families about £918 per annum in water and electricity, nearly twice as much as a bath; that a non-power shower costs an average of £416 per annum in water and electricity; that 12-year-old boys spend longest in the shower, averaging 9 minutes and 41 seconds; and most 'interesting' of all, that women can multi-task in the shower, shaving their legs and cleaning their teeth whilst there.

Can someone please explain to me what business it is, other than for those involved, how long is spent in a shower, how much it costs; what is done whilst there and which cleansing method is used?

Of course, we all know that where 'research' leads in showing a potential wastage, politicians tend to follow in allowing yet more costs to be imposed on users. So how long before we are told that, due to global warming, water is likely to become a scarce commodity and must therefore be 'conserved', consequently it has become necessary that water and electricity prices need to be raised for households with power showers in order to deter said 'wastage' of a valuable resource?

As I hardly think that the sales of Dove soap will be affected whatever method of bathing is used, perhaps the 'research' was prompted by a suggestion from a 'mentalist MP - remember there's 650 of them, so which ever one you select is bound to be correct...........

Just saying...............

6 comments:

Xopher said...

It all become clear now -- I couldn't work out why the man in my bathroom had a stopwatch and clipboard.

Woodsy42 said...

"water is likely to become a scarce commodity and must therefore be 'conserved', "

I thought it already had. We used to have water rates, a fixed charge for supplying water because the actual water wasn't worth measuring. Now we are getting meters which charge useage - eventually, when everyone has combi boilers so no storage tanks in the attic, these will become smart meters, the tools of rationing.

James Higham said...

Well, for those of us with only baths, they'll have to come up with a new issue.

BJ said...

Water's the next CO2 WfW - big time.

The EU have set their orcs to work, the pdf files are flying about, we'll all have a "water footprint", and the bastards will set up a "Water Footprint Scheme" - it's that predictable.

English Pensioner said...

Fresh water is a scarce commodity. A retired friend who was involved in international water issues believes that the next world war will be fought over water. We already have the states along the River Jordan squabbling over its water, but apparently there are many more examples. Even the Welsh moan about the English taking "their" water!

Sceptical Steve said...

Ironically, a very good friend of mine used to sell Power Showers. He had a highly effective and cynical method by which he got the householders to exaggerate the personal cleanliness of their family, and then he hit them with an unbelievable cost saving they could achieve by installing one his showers.
I was struck by the similarities between his disreputble private sector technique and that of the saintly BBC!